Money Moves October 2015

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Welcome to Money Moves for October. This is the section for review and to reflect on the things I have done and what could have been done better for the month. I hope you find it interesting. Hopefully it will help you make better decisions for yourself.

Let’s begin with what the end of the month with my my financial report card. It looks something like this:

Net Income from Work  $2652.99
Expenses $2652.99

Reoccurring Monthly Expenses:
Rent: $1045 1 bedroom 1 bath. It’s Hawaii, rent is expensive
Car Payment: $316.97
Student Loan $202.05
Life Insurance $187.51
Extra to debt 130.98

Assets:

Cash value in 2 life insurance policies $16,276.48
SEP IRA $11,630.85
Total: $27,907.33

Liabilities

student loan $20,023.06
Car loan $10,015.61
Chase credit card $3448.54
miscellaneous loan $6312.88
Total: ($39,800.09)

Current Net Worth: (11,892.76)

A few things to note, I had my credit card paid off, but  I had an idea a few months ago that  I could do a balance transfer and continue to use my credit card without paying interest due to the CARD Act. I wanted to continue using my credit card to take advantage of the 1% cash back, and it would benefit me as long as I continued to pay my balance off in full. I confirmed it with a representative, and he confirmed that I could use my credit card and not be charged interest.

When I got the statement the next month, I found saw that I was charged interest. I had to talk to two different managers to find out that the initial guy was wrong. I have nothing against with balance transfers, if you have a plan to pay it off and get the right information. To say the least, the idea bombed, and I get to have a nice conversation with my credit card company to reverse the interest charge.

 Another thing you might notice is that my expenses are exactly what I make in a month. I pay for all of my purchases in the same month that I charge them, and I am paying more toward the principal balance of the loan. Essentially, I am using the debt snowball method of paying down my debts.

My checking account is attached to a personal loan account where an overdraft amount is taken out to cover any charges that I make beyond what is in the account. There is no fee charged if I use the overdraft amount, which is really nice, and I am able to pay down my balances on my debts a little bit faster.

Using the debt snowball method and using all of the money in my checking account; I save a little bit on interest charged daily.

I have cash value in my whole life insurance policy (actually it’s 2 policies) that I use as a bank. Cash value life insurance has many living benefits, and being able to use the money in your policy as a “banking system” gives a person a lot of flexibility when purchasing something and being able to grow and get dividends on the amount in the policy as well.

The last thing to note is that I received income from my employelr in a retirement fund. As you can see above income, from the SEP IRA, has been into the 70% stocks and 30% into bonds. Using Fidelity as the brokerage firm, the money is invested into a few stocks of Netflix, a total stock index fund from Vanguard, and a total bond index from Vanguard. I did that so that I would have the ability to have growth in the stock market and pay the least amount of fees possible. I’ll talk about fees and how it hurts the growth of your investment in the future.

Plans for the Next Month

I’ve finalized how I am going to pay off the debt in the most efficient way. I’m going to pay off the remainder of my credit card balance with cash that is in my whole life policy. That way I won’t have to pay any interest on my credit card, and I no longer have to call my credit card company to reverse the interest charges.

Paying myself back for the loan balance I have taken out at my insurance company. The policies do not accrue interest on a daily rate like credit cards, and interest is only charged to me when my premium is due. That means that I pay my premiums in in July and October, and if there is an outstanding balance, I pay interest then. Also, I’ve got it set up where I don’t have to pay interest at all on the loan by filling up my policies before the billing statements come out.

Setting up this website and making it look presentable. I’m doing my best at getting this website started with a little mishap of setting up the domain and host of the site. As this site begins to grow, I hope that I can add more to it in the future.

Author: Michael Subido @ Personal Finance in Paradise

my name is Mike and I live in Honolulu Hawaii. Living in paradise has his trials money happens to be one of them. I've had my financial problems, I've probably gone through all the major ones including student debt, credit card debt, dealing with creditors, and cosigning loans. I found myself in about $66,500 in debt in 2010 and over 28 months I had paid off close to $40,000 of debt making about $25,000 a year gross income. That's pretty hard to do considering the cost of living in paradise. After that I was able to purchase a car in cash, put away some savings, and also get married. What I want for you is to learn from my experiences so that you do not make the same mistakes. I heard it said that smart people learn from experiences and wise people learn from others experiences, and my goal for you is to become wise and teach others to be wise.

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